​Understanding Frame Measurements

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When you are shopping for glasses, one of the things to look at is the size. This is especially important when shopping online because you don’t get to try them on. Perhaps you’ve never thought about this factor if you’ve only shopped in person, but if you look on the inside of your frame you will see numbers. The numbers typically look something like 53- 17- 140.

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This seemingly random set of numbers is the diameter of the lens, the width of the bridge, and the length of the side. All measurements are in millimeters. Below is an explanation of these measurements and is a good guide for how to use them.

Lens Diameter

This is the width of the lens as measured from the bridge. This is a matter of preference but is dependent upon your frame style. More on that later.

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Bridge Width

There is a gap between the lenses. The bridge connects the frames through that gap and this is an important measurement. If the gap is too tight, the glasses can pinch your nose. If the gap is too loose, they won’t be stable on your face.

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Side Length (Temple)

There are standard lengths for side pieces. They are 135, 140, or 145 (millimeters). This is important because the side needs to be long enough to sit over your ears, comfortably. If a frame has straight sides, this measurement may not be listed.

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How To Use The Measurements

As previously mentioned, getting a proper bridge design and size is very important when choosing a frame. The width of the lens is a matter of choice, but there are guidelines to follow for a proper fit.

The size of the frame should be proportional on your face. Small face? Don’t get a large frame. If you like rocking the over sized look, go for it provided the frames are not too far past your temples.

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Using these three measurements as a scale for the overall frame may help you get an idea of other factors as well. As a rule, the top frame should not go higher than your brow line. The lower edge of the frame should never be sitting on your cheek. 

  • Proper fit
  • measurements
  • Bridge
  • lens
  • temple
  • size
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